Written on Vinyl

I was recently involved in a discussion on the merits of vinyl records. During which it was argued that an albums worn scratches being heard in the background is part of what makes it a timeless piece of art.

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With that idea in mind I am continuing this in a timeless piece format. For future readers who can one day re read this and see my work for the art that it is.

I would like to start by saying these albums were sold originally for between 2 and 7 dollars, on average from

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and I have owned and played a lot of vinyl in my life, along with cassettes and 8 tracks. I do upon occasion miss a turntable, and the sound of a diamond needle while it carves through the spiraling groves. A process very similar to the earliest and longest lasting recordings, improved but never perfected.

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Apple was known as world wide by its logo, the split half green apple in the center of all those Beatles albums that were being sold in the 1960’s. We should be clear, that was a different apple than today’s Apple, but the Beatles reference is being used as to place an idea of the value placed on vinyl discs. Or my own personal values regarding

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The biggest danger to listening to your favorite album, was listening to your album.

The were any number of calamities which could incur from the time you removed an album the first time, and each and every time following. So that album you picked up for 10 bucks at the used music shop is a little worn, let’s examine what it has survived.

The first piece of damage to that album came to was due in part to it’s packaging. Most albums purchased had the cellophane wrap immediately torn off, akin to a child ripping open his birthday gifts, before being slipped in between other wrapper-less pieces. The cardboard album artwork became worn and faded, the corners turned gray, of course

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The inner sleeve, meant to further protect the vinyl, often was misplaced or discarded, resulting in more damage through use and sliding into its cardboard home.

That was the Alpha and Omega of the album, but the earlier mentioned turntable was the filler. Placing, or dropping the head shell and needle cartridge onto an album, and removing or tearing the needle off is where the most prevalent damages could occur. Resulting in the

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Moderate heat was not good for albums, creating a warped surface that a needle could be challenged to stay flush with. Some used a penny trick to weigh down the needle with, adding weight to the grooves and again increasing the wear on the vinyl pressing.

The automatic return allowed albums to be stacked and drop onto one another, allowing the listener to play one side of multiple records, added a bit of vinyl to vinyl contact and increased the chance that the album would become “timeless art”. Unless the turntable did not have an automatic return fzzz pop

fzzz pop

fzzz pop

fzzz pop

 

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